Anesthetic, Local (Topical Application Route)  
 

Descriptions

This medicine belongs to a group of medicines known as topical local anesthetics. Topical anesthetics are used to relieve pain and itching caused by conditions such as sunburn or other minor burns, insect bites or stings, poison ivy, poison oak, poison sumac, and minor cuts and scratches.

Topical anesthetics deaden the nerve endings in the skin. They do not cause unconsciousness as do general anesthetics used for surgery.

Most topical anesthetics are available without a prescription; however, your doctor may have special instructions on the proper use and dose for your medical problem.

Before Using

Allergies

Tell your doctor if you have ever had any unusual or allergic reaction to medicines in this group or any other medicines. Also tell your health care professional if you have any other types of allergies, such as to foods dyes, preservatives, or animals. For non-prescription products, read the label or package ingredients carefully.

Pediatric

Benzocaine may be absorbed through the skin of young children and cause unwanted effects. There is no specific information comparing use of other topical anesthetics in children with use in other age groups, but it is possible that they may also cause unwanted effects in young children. Check with your doctor before using any product that contains a topical anesthetic for a child younger than 2 years of age.

Geriatric

Many medicines have not been studied specifically in older people. Therefore, it may not be known whether they work exactly the same way they do in younger adults or if they cause different side effects or problems in older people. There is no specific information comparing use of topical anesthetics in the elderly with use in other age groups.

Pregnancy

Although studies on effects in pregnancy have not been done in humans, topical anesthetics have not been reported to cause problems in humans. Lidocaine has not been shown to cause birth defects or other problems in animal studies. Other topical anesthetics have not been studied in animals.

Breastfeeding

Topical anesthetics have not been reported to cause problems in nursing babies.

Drug Interactions

Although certain medicines should not be used together at all, in other cases two different medicines may be used together even if an interaction might occur. In these cases, your doctor may want to change the dose, or other precautions may be necessary. When you are taking any of these medicines, it is especially important that your healthcare professional know if you are taking any of the medicines listed below. The following interactions have been selected on the basis of their potential significance and are not necessarily all-inclusive.

Using medicines in this class with any of the following medicines is usually not recommended, but may be required in some cases. If both medicines are prescribed together, your doctor may change the dose or how often you use one or both of the medicines.

·         Varicella Virus Vaccine

·         Warfarin

Other Interactions

Certain medicines should not be used at or around the time of eating food or eating certain types of food since interactions may occur. Using alcohol or tobacco with certain medicines may also cause interactions to occur. Discuss with your healthcare professional the use of your medicine with food, alcohol, or tobacco.

Other Medical Problems

The presence of other medical problems may affect the use of medicines in this class. Make sure you tell your doctor if you have any other medical problems, especially:

·         Infection at or near the place of application or

·         Large sores, broken skin, or severe injury at the area of application—the chance of side effects may be increased.

Precautions

After applying this medicine to the skin of a child, watch the child carefully to make sure that he or she does not get any of the medicine into his or her mouth. Topical anesthetics can cause serious side effects, especially in children, if any of the medicine gets into the mouth or is swallowed.

Stop using this medicine and check with your doctor:

·         If your condition does not improve within 7 days, or if it gets worse

·         If the area you are treating becomes infected

·         If you notice a skin rash, burning, stinging, swelling, or any other sign of irritation that was not present when you began using this medicine

·         If you swallow any of the medicine

Side Effects

Along with its needed effects, a medicine may cause some unwanted effects. Although not all of these side effects may occur, if they do occur they may need medical attention.

Check with your doctor immediately if any of the following side effects occur:

Less common

1.    Large swellings that look like hives on the skin or in the mouth or throat

Symptoms of too much medicine being absorbed by the body

1.    Blurred or double vision

2.    confusion

3.    convulsions (seizures)

4.    dizziness or lightheadedness

5.    drowsiness

6.    feeling hot, cold, or numb

7.    headache

8.    increased sweating

9.    ringing or buzzing in the ears

10. shivering or trembling

11. slow or irregular heartbeat

12. troubled breathing

13. unusual anxiety, excitement, nervousness, or restlessness

14. unusual paleness

15. unusual tiredness or weakness

Check with your doctor as soon as possible if any of the following side effects occur:

Other side effects not listed may also occur in some patients. If you notice any other effects, check with your healthcare professional.

Reference: Mayoclinic.org

 




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